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privacy, to allow the growth of electronic communications without compromising the needs of law enforcement. 1986, therafted in same year that fox news was and president reagan launched a strike of khadafi. marcus unterberg was one year old. the world was a different place and we can all agree on that. governing the internet is like having a national highway policy drafted in the 19th century. the is the first of hearings that the subcommittee will have, and we will explore the needs of government, to access the contents of stohr electronic communications and the level of judicial review required to obtain them. this was a necessary response to the rapid development of wireless communication services and electronic communications in the digital era. at that time, electronic mail was -- pagers were in their infancy. to voicebeen limited communications and addressed an area of communications for which there is a fourth amendment right to privacy. extending the wiretap provisions for wireless voice communications and electronic communications such as e-mail and other computer trans
francisco has a substantial interest to promote in compliance with the youth sales law in protecting our children from illegally obtaining tobacco. so just the background of why this law exists. there is a lot of laws that exist, and one that i would really like to highlight is you see the old time law book here is the reason that a retailer if a clerk sells to a minor they get a ticket and it is issued a ticket and a fine that is associated with it and it is for code 308 and a violation of a law that you cannot provide tobacco to a person under 18 years of age. and this is a new law? no. you see this book, it is actually from 1906. so the code, 308 you cannot provide tobacco to a minor, and it has been on the books i think from maybe the 1880s or something, but it was in the 1906 version for your interest. there are a lot of laws that have taken effect since then that reinforce the idea that it is illegal to sell to minors. so, these slides, i cannot necessarily read, but, many members of our comment can, the reason that we put these on is that we understand that many people who work i
and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
it but they choose to move it a block and a half up. and dpw's application of the laws is arbitrary and mr. hwang said that it is 300 feet away and how could that be, they are doing something weird. >> thank you, next speaker please. >> hi, my name is keith, and i am not affiliated with any business in the neighborhood. impart of the neighborhood in the sense that i walk and drive those blocks frequently to get from the financial district to my facility. i know that you don't make policy decisions but this is public comment but i will note that the last thing that this block needs is another coffee per vaier particularly a truck that blocks the sidewalk, and it can con gest the traffic further. i am happy to know that there are things that you could deny this application and i hope that you do, you know, pay attention to what you are going to do and hopefully at the end of the day this application will not be allowed to exist, thank you very much. >> next speaker please? >> hi, i'm gary, i'm the applicant. i have gotten no rest in 15 calls from the department of public health over the last week.
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered clifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on course. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. the israelis, two y
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
'm going home and there is people all the time up in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court a
benefits as couples. in fact, bill clinton who signed doma into law when he was president, is now asking the u.s. supreme court to overturn it. let's bring in cnn legal contributor powell cowen. how much will the reversal potentially make? >> supreme court justices would tell you they're immune from politicians lobbying them. they're appointed for life by the president, and the founding fathers frankly set up the system so you would have sort of an independent judiciary. i don't think bill clinton's position will have a major impact on the court. >> so what the constitutional argument that will be made to keep doma in place? >> well, there are two cases before the court this week. one on tuesday and one on wednesday. the first on tuesday is called the prop 8 case. california case, and it's very interesting because the california supreme court said gay marriage is legal. they said it's against the california constitution to ban it. and then lawyers came in and voters went out and they adopted prop 8, which amended the california constitution to make it illegal. so they stuck it to the jud
television. nbc's kristin welker has more on that from the white house. >> reporter: with stiffer gun laws facing an uncertain future in congress, new york mayor michael bloomberg squared off against national rifle association's ceo wayne la pierre on "meet the press" today. >> i think i've spent $12 million on running ads. >> he can't buy america. >> tell didn't don't protect criminals. >> reporter: bloomberg announced a $12 million campaign aimed at convincing swing senators to support universal background checks. >> i've owned a gun all my life and i'll fight for my right to keep it. background checks have nothing to do with taking guns away from anyone. >> reporter: bloomberg's strategy -- create a counterweight to the nra, harnessing the groundswell of support for tougher laws in the wake of the newtown tragedy. >> 90% of the public wants something and their representatives vote against that. common sense says they are going to have a price to pay for that. >> he he's going to find out this is a country of the people, by the people and for the people and he can't spend enough of his $
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
job was to the introduction changed. [laughter] i happily attended stanford law school but in the process i met my husband to be john o'connor and he was a year behind me in moscow and we decided to get married and i graduated you both like to eat that met one of us would have to work and that was me. i thought no problem there were at least 40 notices from law firms and california saying law graduates we would be happy to talk to about job opportunities. give us a call. there were 40 different messages. i would call every month not a single one would even give me an interview. why? because we don't hire women. that was the way it was. i got out about 1952 but isn't that amazing? they wouldn't even talk and i really did need to get a job. [laughter] i heard the county attorney from redwood city once had a woman lawyer on the staff and i thought that was encouraging. unaided appointment. in california they elect the county attorney. so he gave me an appointment he was very ninth set -- nice and agreeable and did say he had a woman on his staff and she did well and he wou
're confident that both history and the law will be on their side. telling us today they feel a ruling is not only critical for same-sex couples looking for equal rights, but also for the next generation. >> they don't have to worry about being second-class citizens growing up. >>> also today, a group of influential doctors endorsed same-sex marriage. the american academy of pediatrics said it's in the best interests of children offering children long-term security, rights and benefits. the doctors made the declaration after four years of analysis and research. >>> the 20-year-old woman who said she was a rape victim last month at uc santa cruz has been officially charged with making a false report. she reported she was beaten and raped on campus in a mid afternoon attack. they stepped up police patrols, public meetings and an 11-day investigation. triplet had bruises on her body that day but investigators haven't discovered how she got them. >>> two oakland city council members, they say, illegally interfered with the bidding process of a major construction contract. they accuse them
. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to
to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health association of san francisco. let me start
. >> they will be mindful of the limited role as judges to interpret existing law. >> plus, legal analysis on how the issues might be viewed on the highest court in the land. stay tuned for the special coverage of gay marriage before the u.s. supreme court. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm scott shafer. welcome to this week in northern california. next tuesday, more than four years after california voters approved proposition 8, the state's ban on same-sex marriage, it gets a hearing from the u.s. supreme court. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples. >> we reignited a fundamental debate. >> scott: outside city hall, gays and lesbians lines up around the block. about 4,000 couples tied the knot. it was not to last. at the
cake and candles, the birthday bash for obama care t president's health care law turning 3ears old. and the ft couldn't be happier. >> it's helped us honor our promise of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. >> but as democrats party we're unwrapping more costs hidden in the health care law, a gift now standing 67 inches high, taller than the president when you pile on all of the new regulations. cashen in crashing the party right now. >> hello everybody. i'm eric boling. wayne rogers, jonathan and tracy all joining us this week. welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly yet. it's three years since president obama signed owe bbama care. boy, is it starting to get messy. that's not republicans declaring it messy. that's one of the architects of the law saying it. watch. >> i think we know it'soing to be messy. there's going to be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> he's right. we bought this cake the woman there said you know what, obama care, that's why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that. >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is one exampl
. you will not mean to. the state has interest in defending the law. are startingts interest to the state. the concern is about how society and the institution of marriage will be damaged by this radical definition. >> you agree that moral disapproval as off the table? we are not going to criminalize a homosexual activity. we cannot do that. we disapprove of its. we are not going to allow same- sex couples to call themselves married because we disapprove. >> moral disapproval has nothing bases for these defending traditional marriage. are there some voters who may have boded because of proposition 08 because of moral disapproval? it goes both ways. of course people will have a mixed motives. think the states in the house report and on the floor are off the table? not consider them? of course a lot of this will tie into which standard of review the court and adopting. when you have plenty of statements in the congressional record discussing the importance of uniform eligibility it is weird cherry picking to say we will give decisive wait to these one or two or three statements
and liberal laws to voting rights. not to mention president obama already in a constitutional challenge to his choices to sit on the national labor relations board. they're taking its fight all the way to the supreme court after a d.c. appellate court invalidated the recess appointments made when the senate wasn't in recess. the senator has vowed to block the nomination. other stories we are bringing you tonight, wall street shrugging off a botched european union bailout of banks and an unprecedented tax on the deposits in cyprus, a tiny nation of 1.1 million people that will cost investors hundreds of billions of dollars in market capitalization. the dow jones industrial average down more than 100 points earlier but rebounded losing a modest 62 points. the s&p fell nine, the nasdaq down 11 and a half. the market off of the lows of the day. officials revising the imprudent and unreasonable plan to seize money from bank depositors to pay for the eu bailout. much damage has been done and some investors are so shaken, they will take their money out of the banks at their first opportunity, which i
to him. there was no indication he was going to kill a law enforcement officer. >>> judge agreed to resign. 58-year-old judge paul seeman is accused of stealing a million and a half dollars from his neighbor. ktvu channel 2 news was the first to report this story. he has been on leave since he was arrested last june but he continued to get his salary. he is facing 32 felony charges, 12 counts of perjury, elder theft and grand theft and unauthorized disclosure of information. >>> vacant store fronts are a problem for san jose. ktvu's robert handa is in downtown where a quick fix could pave the way to a permanent solution there. robert? >> reporter: that's right. we are at a building that is usually empty but as you can see it is bustling. this activity is part of san jose's plan to get rid of the economic and image related problems that come with vacant buildings. >> reporter: the chef is whipping up dishes for a crowd of people in downtown san jose. this stretch doesn't usually see much traffic because of all the vacant buildings so today they launched start up san jose, to attra
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the re
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
it the law of the land you can't discriminate in the area of marriage. >> u.s. solicitor general will have a final 10 minutes or och sigs. he represents the president and will likely be asked about mr. obama's shift to support same-sex marriage. a key justice to watch will be justice anthony ken neddy. he has been a strong degrernd of gay rights and a champion of state ri.s he could be the swing vote. the court could dismiss the case for want of standing which would allow same-sex marriages in california. the court could rule prop 8 is unconstitutional, it could threaten similar bans in other states or could leave prop 8 in place ruling states have the right to decide for themselves. the 9th circuits decision states voters didn't have the right to take away the freedom california supreme court already granted. coming up at 6:00 state attorney general will weigh in along with one of the berkeley women who is one of the plaintiffs in this case. a quick correction. i said prop 8 vote was 2004. it was 2008. on california voters ban same-sex marriage in the state. reporting from the newsroom ab
a scandal. in the next administration, angelico van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law, martin van buren, who is a wood door. -- widower. tonight, on c-span. >> last week the senate veterans affairs committee held a hearing on veterans mental health care and the need for assuring timely access to care. the hearing heard testimony from two panels, including mental health specialists and military veterans advocates. according to the veterans affairs committee chair, veterans are committing suicide at a rate of more than 8003 year and he urged the affairs department to increase the hiring rate for mental health clinicians. [gavel] of thethis hearing saturn -- senate veterans' affairs committee is beginning. i want to start by thanking our wonderful panelists for their years of experience in the important areas they are discussing with us today. i want to thank the va for being here as well. know, it isk we all 10 years with the united states went to war in iraq, went to war in afghanistan before that. what we have learned in a variety of ways is that the cost of those wars has been ve
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 543 (some duplicates have been removed)